Trek-Segafredo rolls out HeadCheck concussion care

Improved concussion care for riders

Trek-Segafredo proudly announces a partnership with HeadCheck Health, Inc. The company’s unique concussion assessment tool, HeadCheck, fortifies head injury management for riders using evidence-based science, cycling-specific modifications, and smartphone technology. This new tool enables Trek-Segafredo medical staff to rapidly and accurately assess concussions as well as track rider recovery.

In October at the Trek-Segafredo team camp at Trek’s global headquarters in Waterloo, WI, four medical professionals used HeadCheck to assess all Trek-Segafredo riders, providing baseline data for comparison against a post-injury assessment. If a suspected head injury occurs during a race or in training, Trek-Segafredo staff can respond immediately by accessing HeadCheck from their phones and assessing a rider’s response levels and immediately compare results to the baseline data.

“This is a very powerful tool,” said Trek-Segafredo Head Doctor Nino Daniele. “Now we can easily and accurately measure when it is safe for an athlete to continue riding after a concussion.”

"This is a very powerful tool," said Trek-Segafredo Head Doctor Nino Daniele.

Road riders compete at extreme speeds which can result in dangerous crashes. A 2018 study published in The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness showed that more than one in five cyclists experience a sports-related concussion. Trek-Segafredo believes athletes deserve top-level protection for their health which is why they are now using HeadCheck for their men’s and women’s teams.

HeadCheck also assists in a rider’s safe recovery after a crash. In addition to assessments by medical staff, riders can track and self-report any symptoms from their mobile devices. HeadCheck has found that cyclists are some of the most active athletes in self-reporting through the tool.

"Trek continues to demonstrate great leadership in the cycling community by taking a proactive approach to the health and wellness of their riders," said HeadCheck Health CEO Harrison Brown.

A wide range of professional and amateur teams in sports such as football, rugby, hockey, and soccer use HeadCheck for concussion assessment and management. Trek worked with HeadCheck Health to understand how to adapt the tool to cycling sports. Trek-Segafredo’s partnership with HeadCheck Health is an expansion of Trek’s relationship with the company which already provides Trek Factory Racing Downhill, Cross-Country, and Enduro teams with their tools and support. HeadCheck’s smartphone technology and offline capabilities are crucial for rugged off-road trail competitors.

“Trek continues to demonstrate great leadership in the cycling community by taking a proactive approach to the health and wellness of their riders,” said HeadCheck Health CEO Harrison Brown. “The addition of the Trek-Segafredo road cycling team to HeadCheck is an important step in working together to advance concussion management practices in the sport.”


Increase in Diagnosed Concussions Following Mandated Concussion Policy

Study shows there is still room for improvement in documenting suspected concussions.

A study examining the effect of Ontario’s Policy/Program Memorandum #158 (PPM #158) – a policy requiring each publicly funded school board in the province to create and implement a concussion policy – has found that there has been a 30% increase in diagnosed concussions in school children after policy was implemented.[1]

Comparing Trends

The study, published in the November 2018 issue of BMC Public Health, examined 21,094 head injuries in youth aged 4-18 between 2009-2016 from five hospitals across Ontario. The purpose being to compare trends of the 8,935 diagnosed and 12,159 suspected concussions in youth before and after PPM #158 was established in March 2014.

In the 5 years prior to PPM #158, the average number of diagnosed concussions in school children was 89 concussions/month. That number increased to 117 diagnosed concussions/month after the policy was established. Similarly, there was an “almost twofold” increase in the number of diagnosed concussions where the concussion-inducing incident happened at school. Before March 2014, school-incurred concussions accounted for 28% of all diagnosed concussions. This rate increased to almost 50% in 2016. The most common places of injury at school were the playground (24%), gymnasium (22%), or sports field (20%).

The Gender Equation

Finally, there was also an increase of diagnosed concussions in females, growing from 38% in 2013 to 46% in 2016 after PPM #158. This increase in the number of confirmed concussions in women is important.[2] Some studies have suggested that female head injuries are more often overlooked despite the fact that women may receive more concussions – with longer recoveries – than their male counterparts.[3],[4],[5],[6],[7]

Is the policy truly effective?

It is important to note that the total number of identified head injuries (comprising of both suspected and diagnosed concussions) did not increase after the policy. Given the trends of under-reporting for concussion, this circumstance raises questions as to whether PPM # 158 was indeed effective at increasing concussion awareness and reporting at schools. In fact, the increase in only diagnosed concussions may suggest that there was an improvement in emergency department doctors’ knowledge and confidence in diagnosing concussion – an increase that would be unrelated to the policy.

More Research and More Policies

The study concludes that “ongoing research into the effectiveness of PPM 158 in terms of prevention of concussions and student, teacher, and parental awareness is required.” This call for research should also extend to examining the effectiveness of the Ontario government’s latest concussion safety bill: Bill 193, Rowan’s Law (Concussion Safety), 2018. Further research will help support the direction of changes made to concussion policy and legislation in Ontario as well as push other provinces to develop and implement effective concussion policy and legislation.

You can read the full study here: https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-018-6232-9

About The Author

Rebecca Babcock is a recent graduate of the University of Otago in New Zealand, completing a Master’s in Bioethics and Health Law. Her thesis examined the ethical and legal issues surrounding concussion management. She currently spends her time working for the Concussion Legacy Foundation – Canada as a programming coordinator and at Sunnybrook Hospital investigating concussion prevention, management, and education services. Her dream is to be a clinical ethicist at a hospital which she is starting to fulfill by volunteering as a bioethics assistant at Humber River Hospital in Toronto.

 

Footnotes

[1] Ministry of Education of Ontario. Policy/Program memorandum no. 158. 2014. http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/extra/eng/ppm/158.pdf. Accessed 9 Feb 2017.

[2] Zhang AL, et al. The rise of concussions in the adolescent population. Orthopaedic journal of sports medicine. 2016;4(8):2325967116662458.

[3] Snyder M. Girls Suffer Sports Concussions at a Higher Rate than Boys. Why Is That Overlooked? The Washington Post. 2015. https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/02/10/our-effort-to-reduce-concussions-inyouth-sports-overlooks-the-biggest-victims-girls/?utm_term=.29b684e6a9a9.Accessed 14 Feb 2017.

[4] Abrahams S, et al. Risk factors for sports concussion: an evidence-based systematic review. Br J Sports Med. 2014;48(2):91–7.

[5] Schallmo MS, Joseph AW, Wellington KH. Sport and sex-specific reporting trends in the epidemiology of concussions sustained by high school athletes. JBJS. 2017;99(15):1314–20.

[6]Resch JE, et al. Sport concussion and the female athlete. Clin Sports Med. 2017;36(4):717–39.

[7] Covassin T, Moran R, Elbin RJ. Sex differences in reported concussion injury rates and time loss from participation: an update of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program from 2004–2005 through 2008–2009. J Athl Train. 2016;51(3):189–94.


How It Works: HeadCheck And The New CJHL Concussion Program

HeadCheck Health will be providing concussion management software to help the CJHL’s 10 Member Leagues perform their concussion protocol as part of the new CJHL Concussion Program. The software will allow all 133 teams to perform the new mandatory concussion protocol and each league to monitor protocol compliance. Funding from The Co-operators as part of the SJHL Assistance Program provided the foundation for the program.

"The entire CJHL Board feels introducing HeadCheck is a major step forward in moving towards better concussion management throughout the CJHL. We feel it’s a very proactive and positive undertaking to keep CJHL Member Leagues and members ahead of the curve in player safety, which is a paramount concern within our program." - Brent Ladds, CJHL President

How It Works

  • Team trainers utilize HeadCheck's mobile app to document suspected concussions and perform any concussion testing required by the protocol
  • Information can be transferred with the player to medical professionals for further diagnosis
  • Partner clinics will receive access to HeadCheck to log any notes or perform additional assessments
  • Notifications can be automatically sent to clinics and emergency contacts when a suspected concussion is documented
  • Concussion history for all players will be securely stored in the HeadCheck system
  • Medical clearance can be run through HeadCheck to ensure players only return-to-play with proper approval
  • Player history can move from team-to-team or league-to-league with authorization
  • League can monitor protocol compliance through HeadCheck’s web dashboard
  • HeadCheck and league commissioners review reporting on aggregate data to make safety improvements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HeadCheck Services Provided to CJHL

  • Technology training sessions for all individuals using the mobile app
  • Profile creation for all 3000+ players and any new players who enter a league
  • Account setup and system access for partner clinics
  • Certified AT support for any baseline testing required by teams
  • Assistance with trades and player movement done through web platform
  • 24/7 ongoing support

Contact us to learn more about bringing HeadCheck to your organization.

About HeadCheck Health, Inc

HeadCheck provides concussion management software that is customized to the requirements of any concussion policy. A mobile app can be used to document suspected concussions, run concussion assessments and track an athlete’s concussion history. An enhanced web dashboard provides an overview of testing activity, more thorough athlete management, and the monitoring of concussion policy adherence. The system provides medical and non-medical roles to support the varying medical qualifications of individuals working with teams. All data is securely stored and meets the latest health privacy standards. Over 400 organizations across North America use HeadCheck as their primary tool for concussion management, including the CJHL, BC Hockey, UBC, BC Rugby, Eastern Washington University, Rugby Ontario, St. George’s School, and Okotoks Minor Hockey. For more information visit https://www.headcheckhealth.com

ABOUT THE CJHL

The Canadian Junior Hockey League is a national organization comprised of 10 Junior A hockey leagues in Canada. The CJHL represents 133 teams and more than 3,000 players. The CJHL operates under the auspices of the Hockey Canada Branch structure and is a member in good standing within Hockey Canada. The CJHL is the only sanctioned Junior A Hockey League in Canada and has over 3,000 alumni furthering their hockey careers at the professional, major junior and college levels across North America. The CJHL is comprised of the BCHL, AJHL, SJHL, MJHL, SIJHL, NOJHL, OJHL, LHJQ, CCHL, and MHL. For more information on CJHL please visit http://www.cjhlhockey.com


Canadian Junior Hockey League announces new concussion program

CALGARY, Alta. -- The Canadian Junior Hockey League (CJHL) in conjunction with The Co-operators and HeadCheck Health Inc., announced today the first national concussion program available across the CJHL to safeguard player mental and physical well being.

The CJHL Concussion Program Funded by The Co-operators, establishes a mandatory concussion protocol for the CJHL that will implement clear guidelines for the recognition, assessment, and management of concussion.

“Player safety is our number one priority,” said Brent Ladds, President of the CJHL. “The long-term effects of concussion are a growing concern for our organization, our athletes and their families. This is a major milestone for improving concussion management standards in junior hockey. We are grateful to the SJHL Assistance Program which provided the foundation for this program.  Thanks to the partnership with The Co-operators we are able to make it available to our players across the league.”

Although most individuals who suffer concussion recover without lasting effect, research shows that 10–20% of concussion patients may face a difficult recovery, sometimes leading to mental health issues.

“We recognize that junior hockey players can be vulnerable to concussions because they’re playing a contact sport. We want to support them as they pursue their hockey careers by providing an extra safety net with this concussion program,” said Kevin Daniel, Executive Vice President at Co-operators Life Insurance Company.  “We see supporting initiatives like this that protect mental health, especially for youth, as an essential part of our commitment to building healthier, more sustainable communities. We’re proud to work with the CJHL on this national concussion program to provide peace of mind for parents, players and the league.”

The CJHL Concussion Program will use innovative mobile and web-based software from HeadCheck Health, Inc. (HeadCheck) that will allow team trainers to perform the concussion protocol and the league to monitor compliance. Under the new program, a player’s concussion history will be digitally tracked and transferred with them for more informed healthcare decisions.

“We look forward to working with the CJHL to ensure that all players, regardless of team or skill level, will be afforded the same level of concussion care, said Harrison Brown, CEO of HeadCheck. “We’re very pleased that The Co-operators are aligned in our mission of improving player safety. This is a major milestone for improving concussion management standards in junior A hockey."

HeadCheck and the CJHL will regularly review aggregate data and continuously improve the program. All data collected through HeadCheck meets Canada health privacy standards and can only be accessed by authorized individuals.

ABOUT THE CJHL

The Canadian Junior Hockey League is a national organization comprised of 10 Junior A hockey leagues in Canada. The CJHL represents 133 teams and more than 3,000 players. The CJHL operates under the auspices of the Hockey Canada Branch structure and is a member in good standing within Hockey Canada. The CJHL is the only sanctioned Junior A Hockey League in Canada and has over 3,000 alumni furthering their hockey careers at the professional, major junior and college levels across North America. The CJHL is comprised of the BCHL, AJHL, SJHL, MJHL, SIJHL, NOJHL, OJHL, LHJQ, CCHL, and MHL. For more information on CJHL please visit http://www.cjhlhockey.com

ABOUT THE CO-OPERATORS

The Co-operators Group Limited is a Canadian co-operative with more than $41 billion in assets under administration. Through its group of companies it offers home, auto, life, group, travel, commercial and farm insurance, as well as investment products.  The Co-operators is well known for its community involvement and its commitment to sustainability. The Co-operators is listed among the Best Employers in Canada by Aon Hewitt and Corporate Knights’ Best 50 Corporate Citizens in Canada. For more information, visit www.cooperators.ca.

ABOUT HEADCHECK HEALTH INC.

HeadCheck provides concussion management software that is customized to the requirements of any concussion policy. A mobile app can be used to document suspected concussions, run concussion assessments and track an athlete’s concussion history. An enhanced web dashboard provides an overview of testing activity, more thorough athlete management, and the monitoring of concussion policy adherence. The system provides medical and non-medical roles to support the varying medical qualifications of individuals working with teams. All data is securely stored and meets the latest health privacy standards. Over 400 organizations across North America use HeadCheck as their primary tool for concussion management, including the CJHL, BC Hockey, UBC, Edmonton Oil Kings, BC Rugby, Eastern Washington University, Rugby Ontario, St. George’s School, and Okotoks Minor Hockey. For more information visit https://www.headcheckhealth.com